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Early Childhood

  • Engaging young minds with custom playgrounds

    At Playworld, we’re always looking for ways to help little folks laugh, learn, and grow. Our playgrounds often serve as foundations of children’s play, allowing them to develop skills and discover the world around them. Research shows that imaginative, make-believe play helps develop a variety of mental abilities, including sustained attention, memory, logical reasoning, language and literacy skills, as well as creativity.

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    To entice even the youngest of minds to the playground, it is critical to create unique, modern spaces that kids will want to explore. Custom playgrounds can provide children with exciting play spaces that spark their curious imaginations. Thinking “custom” means a bigger price tag? Don’t worry, there are many ways to customize a playground for any budget. All you need to get started is a stellar idea to infuse personality into the play space.

    Playworld, along with our network of distributors, will listen to your needs and soak up inspiration from your local community. These unique projects provide a creative atmosphere for children and can help playgrounds fit effortlessly into their surroundings.

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    For example, children living at Joint Base Charleston, an Air Force facility, are flying high thanks to a new, custom playground. The play space features two areas, one for kids ages 5-12 and the other for those ages 2-12. A rocket-themed play structure was a completely custom piece designed specifically for this community of air base families. The structure for younger children features play panels with custom graphics that resemble the design of the C-17 Globemaster planes that call the air base home. The playground allows young kids to play in a space that fits seamlessly into their community. The familiarity also provides children with a comfortable environment while giving them a platform for imaginative play. For the young kids residing on the base, the sky is limit at their airplane-focused playground.

    From playgrounds featuring planes and trains to hockey, whimsical gardens and everything in between, Playworld can help make today’s dream tomorrow’s reality.  Learn about some of our  custom playground projects and start designing yours today.

  • Play, preschool and academics

    Three decades ago, 40 percent of a typical preschool day was devoted to child-initiated play. Today, this number has fallen dramatically. Over the years, play has become second fiddle to early academic preparation. But are we actually helping children succeed academically and socially by reducing the amount of play in their day?

    Recent research shows that preschool children who engage in various forms of open-ended play display more complex language skills, more developed social skills, greater levels of empathy, higher levels of creativity, and better-developed interpersonal skills. Additionally, preschool children who spend more time playing are less aggressive, exhibit higher levels of executive function, display more complex thinking skills, and have brains with more complex neurological structures.

    Nations like China, Japan and Finland are touted for their exceptional international math and science assessment scores. Those countries also boast preschools that are playful and experimental, not instructive. Much has been written about Finland and the Scandinavian approach to education, where play is a priority and getting dirty is encouraged and viewed as an opportunity to learn.

    A new documentary shows the contrasts between America’s craze for standardized tests and Scandinavia’s acceptance of nature. Play serves as a powerful engine that drives learning in the preschool years and beyond. “NaturePlay: Take Childhood Back” examines this issue. The underlying differentiation shown in the film is the notion that “children belong in nature and nature belongs in education.”

    Earlier this year, The Wall Street Journal featured an article on The Scandinavian School of Jersey City, a “gentle place where 92 children play barefoot to feel a connection to their environment and the air often smells like peppermint or citrus from aromatherapy. Classrooms have bowls of pine cones, seashells and rocks for toys. Some chairs are sawed-off tree stumps.”

    Children who experience play-based preschool programs boast a strong advantage over those who are denied play and are more likely to become happy, healthy, well-adjusted grownups.

    How would you feel about sending your child to a play-focused preschool?

  • New Jersey nursery school updates playground with Playworld equipment

    When Dana Cavanaugh recently became the director at Prospect Cooperative Nursery School, she strongly felt the Maplewood, New Jersey, facility was in need of new, versatile playground equipment that helped young children to feel more physically confident while having more fun.

    With these goals -- and absolute requirements of impeccable safety ratings and long-lasting equipment -- Cavanaugh began searching for a vendor, beginning a selection process she said was “quite overwhelming”.

    “There were many manufacturers with endless choices to choose from, but we went with Playworld based on a recommendation and we’re happy we did,’’ said Cavanaugh.

    The Spring 2016 installation process began with a representative from George Ely Associates, a distributor Playworld equipment, paying a visit to Prospect School.

    “The rep from George Ely Associates really listened to our needs and constraints,” Cavanaugh said. “Taking these factors into account, he came back with a plan.”

    The school chose the Moon Rock Climber, a structure that encourages exploration and discovery, and the Butterfly Climber, equipment that provides children with a safe and fun place to practice their balance and coordination skills.

    From start to finish, the playground project took about three months. Since installation, countless children have engaged with the equipment, climbing, running, jumping and socializing in the play space. Being outside allows the young students at Prospect the freedom to explore their creativity and offers them experiences not provided in the classroom.

    “Playing outside is necessary for the growth and development of preschool children,” said Cavanaugh. “We’re happy we chose Playworld to help us with the early gross motor development of our students. We are already looking to replace another structure on our playground and Playworld is helping us with that now. We’re really excited to be working with the company again and can't wait to see what other outdoor adventures are in store for our kids.”

    Are you in need of innovative, safe playground equipment for your school? Get in touch with your local Playworld representative today.

  • What kids need from adults?

    You might think kids today have it good – endless amounts of information at their fingertips, devices to occupy their time, emojis so they can talk in code to their friends and almost no one has to walk to school anymore.

    But you know what I think? Being a kid today is hard. Think about it. Most kids and teenagers have boatloads of homework, but before they can tackle that work, they have to take a music lesson and go to soccer practice. Some kids even have scheduled play dates. But what about just letting loose and having time for free play? That, my friends, is why being a kid today is hard. There is too little time to relax and be carefree – and really important aspects of development happen when adults back off and let kids explore through unstructured play.

    Honestly, every time I speak to an adult about early child development and developing all sorts of skills, I’m left thoroughly confused. Folks want their kids to be quick learners but don’t want them to spend time doing stuff (read: playing) that might actually benefit them. The general thinking is that play and learning are two separate things, which, in my mind, is nothing short of crazy. Or, as I believe the kids are saying, cray cray.

    For me, the issue of play is serious and this conversation with Erika Christakis struck a chord.

    Her new book, The Importance of Being Little, is a plea for adults - educators and parents alike -  to forgo the mind numbing flashcards, old school worksheets and teaching Mandarin to preschoolers in favor of good old-fashioned play (um, when did play become old-fashioned and can we please change this?).

    Christakis writes, "the distinction between early education and official school seems to be disappearing."

    Why can’t more people get on this page and forget the widely accepted norms? I often wonder why we’re complicating things so much when the answer’s really quite simple. Let your kids play!

    What kids really need right now is for adults to start acting. We need to stop forcing them into so called “meaningful” activities when all they really need to (and want to) do is to play in the mud or roll in the grass. Want to explain the theory of gravity? Don’t just have them read about it in a musty textbook. Go to the playground and have them drop several objects from different heights of playground structures. Above all, make sure you work towards creating relevant and rich play experiences that foster a sense of security and emotional well-being among your kids.

    Stop looking at play as an option; make play a priority!

  • Investing in early childhood play is an investment in tomorrow’s leaders

    A vast majority of young children are accustomed to their daily routine: school and homework.

    Kindergarteners, in addition to spending most of their time indoors, are spending nearly 25 minutes a day on homework. This is despite the fact that the National Education Association (NEA) and the National Parents Teachers Association (PTA) don’t endorse homework for kindergarten.

    Preschoolers are not getting enough play. 30 years ago, it was a different story – 40 percent of a typical preschool day was devoted to child-initiated play. This number has more recently fallen to a meager 25 percent (Miller & Almon, 2009).

    Play is critical for young children to develop various skills that they’ll utilize throughout their lives.  Engaging in unstructured play allows children to explore and develop numerous abilities such as problem-solving, decision making and self-expression.

    Children need interaction, imagination, and creativity. Countries such as China, Japan and Finland, often touted for exceptional international math and science assessment scores, boast preschools that are full of fun and experimental learning – via play!

    Research shows that play serves as a strong engine to power learning in the preschool years and beyond. Children under 5 enrolled in play-based preschool programs possess a strong advantage over those who are denied play, and are more likely to grow into happy, healthy and well-adjusted adults.

    In fact, a recent review of 180 research studies by Duke University psychologist and neuroscientist Harris Cooper revealed that the benefits of homework are highly reliant on age. The review found that for elementary school-aged kids and younger, it is best to hold off on homework because it can potentially have a negative impact. When assigned too early on, homework can foster a negative attitude towards school in general. And it takes time away from them playing, and learning through play.

    It’s clear that when they play, young children develop fine and gross motor skills, balance and strength, plus cognitive and social skills. Playworld’s early childhood play equipment are specifically engineered to build these skills and help children make the most of their priceless play time.

    Learn more about our early childhood product offerings here.

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