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Play ought to be challenging

A recent Washington Post article on rethinking “ultra-safe” playgrounds caught my eye. Featuring the insight of pediatric occupational therapist and play advocate, Angela Honscam, the article echoes the Playworld team’s belief that play equipment must be ‘thrill-provoking’.

Outdoor unstructured play is meant to be fun and liberating. It plays an important role in fostering creativity and building on motor and sensory skills. However, this holds true only if play is stimulating.

The modern day playground, as Honscam writes, is colorful but lacks the “thrill” element. There is a lack of age-appropriate equipment and more often than not, children are bored because they don’t see a challenge. Playgrounds such as this can be counter-productive. They inhibit creativity and deprive children of adequate sensory input. This is particularly alarming because it can result in poor motor and sensory skills, poor attention span and other physical issues.

Much has been written about the importance of play. The perception of it being a frivolous concept is slowly changing. Yet, as people embrace the world of play and decide to build a play space, the emphasis should be on creating an atmosphere that fuels imagination and offers enough of a challenge for children of all ages.

Is your playground challenging enough?